Always do a Little Research–Illegal Immigration

Finally a post to this blog! 

I decided today, instead of spending days on a post like I do for my other blog, I would throw what was on my mind out into the universe and hope someone can comprehend what I mean. Let’s see what happens.

Illegal immigration . . . It has been in the news since before President Trump was elected, even before he campaigned. Most recently, the outcry from people protesting the enforcement of the United States Federal Law regarding the separation of minors from their parents after crossing the border has been solely based–or seemingly so–on emotions.

I agree with many of these protesters that separating a young child from a parent is horrible both for the parent and the child. As a parent who wouldn’t let my children spend the night with other children until they were 12 years old, I would be alarmingly vociferous if I was forced to be separated from my children. But, if it could possibly bring me and my child a better life than the one I was fleeing, I would welcome this temporary separation.

For me, though–one who likes to follow rules–I would come through a designated point of entry into the US where I could seek immediate asylum or refugee status avoiding being separated from my children at all. That also would eliminate immediate deportation, but not having talked to any of the people crossing the border, I have no idea if following the law is easy or difficult.

(Asylum seekers must be fleeing their country because of a racial, religious or nationality type of persecution. If this is proven to not be the case, the person(s) cannot seek asylum.)

As people voice their opinions about this issue, I find it is a good idea to dig deeper than accepting the headlines stating the inhumanity of this separation. In doing so, I found and read an article on the website FAIR–Federation Article for American Immigration Reform, find here. The article lays out in easily understandable language what the law states concerning juveniles and criminal parents.

Federal law specifically prohibits the detention or confinement of juveniles in any institution in which the juvenile would have regular contact with adult persons convicted of a crime or awaiting trial on criminal charges. (18 US Code 5035 https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/5035) From the case of Jenny Lisette Flores vs Janet Reno.

Again, I understand people wanting children to stay with their parents, but I can’t help but wonder if people understand a simple rule of living on this planet. If someone takes resources for themselves that leaves fewer resources for you or your neighbors. Therefore, illegal immigrants entering this country adding no tax revenue to our economy because they do not work here are taking from Americans, many of whom could use those resources–think about how much it must cost to house, supply medical care, feed, etc for these people. Illegal immigrants held at the border are costing Americans a lot financially.

The thing that always strikes me in cases of criminality whether a US citizen or not, is why do people often show a deep compassion for people breaking the law without understanding all the circumstances surrounding the law breaker? Why is the morality of following the laws of our land pushed aside and compassion for the criminal deemed a more justifiable position to hold? Course throw some emotion into a situation and people can lose their rational minds.

As of two weeks ago, President Trump issued an executive order ending this separation temporarily. Whether or not the laws in place regarding immigration need to be changed is another part of the conversation that would necessitate a much deeper investigation on my part. For now, though, the laws for illegal immigration seem clear to me, and I feel confident in saying that the illegal immigrants are fully aware they are breaking them.

There you have it. This is what I was thinking about today.

Things I Ponder

Note: Please visit my other blog for my writings about living with a terminal disease at The Cancer Classroom .

23 things I ponder–writing about them leads to understanding. Sometimes my opinions change; sometimes they stay the same. Stay tuned.

  1. Trying to free yourself of some wrong that you have committed to another person by telling them about it is a horrific idea.
  2. Thinking somehow you can get away from chemicals is one of the stupidest thoughts ever.
  3. Negative thoughts do not necessarily mean you have mental health issues.
  4. No! Juicing does not cure cancer.
  5.  Do morals come from God? No, they come from society.
  6. If Christians are so morally righteous then why do they spend so much time putting each other down?
  7. Shouldn’t a woman’s right-to-choose be about her choice to have sex or not instead of about her choice to have an abortion? Shouldn’t that be what being in charge of your body is about?
  8.  Positive thinking isn’t bad until it is. The lack of positive thinking is not the reason something bad happens to someone.
  9. Saying “everything happens for a reason” only makes you feel better about yourself because the bad thing didn’t happen to you.
  10. And, if the bad thing happens to you and you say that “everything happens for a reason” then you are rationalizing a bad thing to be a good thing to make yourself feel better. Bad things are not good things–they suck.
  11. Why can’t people accept that we have very little control of what happens to us?
  12. Marriage between two people acknowledged by law is simply a contract between two people–doesn’t matter who those two people are. Marriage in a church is between its members and their God. The members of that church can dictate what marriage is and what it is not. Two entirely different topics.
  13. Religion and the belief in God–or any god(s)–is the greatest marketing scheme ever. You can’t prove it and you can’t disprove it.
  14. The eternal flames of HELL–or some other horrible after-life–for being a “bad” person doesn’t scare the people who are mentally disturbed into being a good person. It has never worked; it never will.
  15.  Maybe death is the end of us. Does there have to be something more?
  16. Believing there is a life of eternal bliss after death along-side other loved ones no longer living makes me wonder why there is so much grieving with death? Where is the celebration? Isn’t the person now safe from the harms that happen to us while we are alive? Hasn’t the dead person gone where everyone who believes wants to go? This thinking is supposed to make death easier. It doesn’t. Maybe a new way of thinking needs to be thought. Really though, it is always about ourselves.
  17. Preventative care . . . mammography or colonoscopy are not preventative and should not be sold as such. Those are diagnostic tools used to find what is already there.
  18. We all need hope in our lives when diagnosed with a terminal disease, but how some people can believe in medicines or alternative treatments that have not been proven by science blows my mind.
  19. When a child is supported financially by both parents of whom are divorced and is seen regularly by both parents, are you a single parent? NO, just stop it! Single parents do it all by themselves.
  20. Men who use their wealth and position in society to use women for their own sexual satisfaction are disgusting. But, women who allow themselves to be used and treated disrespectfully because of something they are trying to get are also part of the problem. It can’t be stopped if women–and men–allow these things to happen. I am not talking about rape here.
  21. Parenting–it’s hard, dammit.
  22. More to come . . .